Summary of speed & force accuracy 1080 Sprint & 1080 Quantum, 2015

ACCURACY AND REPEATABILITY OF FORCE, POSITION AND SPEED MEASUREMENT OF 1080 QUANTUM AND 1080 SPRINT

Bergkvist, C., Svensson, M., Eriksrud, O.
1080 Motion AB, Stockholm, Sweden
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Introduction
Technology that offers documentation of force, speed and power is important in both testing, training and rehabilitation. The application of such technology is dependent on validity and reliability of measurements. Currently available technology can quantify these variables of isolated joint motions in specific directions, or in global movements with one type of resistance mode with a limited ability to change speed and external load in the different phases of movement. 1080 Motion has developed technology, embedded in two machines 1080 Quantum and 1080 Sprint, which is more flexible and offers different resistance modes that can be used under different load and speed conditions for the different phases of movement. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of force, position and speed measurements.

Methods
Position accuracy was done using a standard measuring tape. Time was validated by controlling the accuracy of the internal clock. Time and position data was then used for the subsequent calculations (first derivative of position) of speed. Accuracy of force measurements were done by comparing a known mass falling at a constant speed for 1080 Sprint and a force transducer for 1080 Quantum.

Results
Accuracy of position and time measures with subsequent calculations of speed was high for both machines, amounting to ±5 mm/m and ±0.5% for position and speed respectively. The accuracy of the force measurements (p<0.05) for the 1080 Quantum and 1080 sprint were – 4.7N±8.0N and -2.1N ±4.8N respectively. Repeatability of force measurements was found to be 0.7%.

Discussion and conclusion
The technology used in 1080 Quantum and 1080 Sprint should have a wide application in testing, training and rehabilitation based upon the high accuracy of speed, position and force measures, and a wide application to global and functional movement patterns, including cyclical horizontal movements.